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Sunday, September 28, 2008

conscience

When I was just 17, I had finished my first year of uni at a local college. I had a 3 month break before I was supposed to fly off to the UK for the second year. I could have chose to bum around like all my friends did, but I ended up doing an internship stint with a local company which turned out to be the most educational 3 months of my life.

It was my first ever job and my boss turned out to be one of the most awesome people I had ever met (he still is). I was taught (drummed into me, in fact) that work ethics were the single most important thing in the working world. It doesn't matter if you are smart or stupid, but if you do the job you are paid to do, half the task would be accomplished.

Countless times I've woken up to a spinning headache after a late night out, and countless other times I've woken up after a long holiday, dreading to go to work, but I have never called in sick or made excuses to come in late. It's not that I love my job, or hate my job - it's plain and simple that I am being paid to do it.

On Saturday, I was offered free grandstand tickets to the Singapore F1 race. I had to say no. I couldn't take leave on Monday because my Muslim colleagues had already gone on their long leave. My friend asked me to call in sick. Another told me to ponteng half a day and nobody would notice (which was true since all the bosses are on leave for Raya). Another told me I was an idiot for even thinking twice about it. I was tempted. Very tempted.

I got off the phone, started thinking of how I was going to make the trip down, when I then realised that I couldn't do it. I had never skipped school before, never skipped work - and so it didn't make sense to start now. Sure, it was FREE grandstand tickets to the first ever Formula 1 night race, but I just couldn't do something like that. I couldn't just take the money that people pay me at the end of the month, knowing that I had cheated them out of it. I called back my friend and said that I had to pass. She said she never heard me sound so sad before.

I spent pretty much the whole weekend feeling like shit that I passed up a great chance that I will probably never get again, but knowing that it was the right decision (or so I tell myself). The thing is, when I woke up this morning I felt really proud of myself.

And let me tell you this - in my book, there is no greater feeling than that.

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Ramblings:
bravo!! good on u mate
 



The hardest choices are always the most worthy- pride and ethics are worth a lot in my books...
 



it wouldve kicked ass if you went! I barely know what's happening (never watched b4 *malu*) and was counting on ur commentary.. ah well. but yeah, u prolly won't enjoy it as much if u were feeling too guilty about work anyway. some other time yeah =)
 



yr ex boss taught u well. all my yrs of service i have never cheated in any way in terms of time, money or effort. some call it ethics. i prefer to call it what we must do
 



having good principles will always cost you something, whether it be your peers' impressions of you or premium seats at the most exciting grand prix of the season so far (not to rub it in, but it was!).

but you're the winner in the long run. there are something things that you should be stubborn about. would be great if people learnt from this example.

 



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